Common Private Cord Blood Banking Myths Debunked


You may have noticed that there are loads of promoting and promotions done by banks these days. however what's a twine bank exactly? Well, it's a medical bank wherever doctors extract the hematogenic stem cells (HSCs) from the newborn duct and may be preserved indefinitely. you'll bank the blood in a very personal or a public one and may be used in a while to treat diseases and sicknesses. this could sound sort of a fantastic medical breakthrough, however, their square measure several myths regarding personal twine blood banking creating the rounds. allow us to have a glance at these myths and break the misconceptions vaporization the minds of parents-to-be.

1. will It damage My Baby Be Harmed?

Collection of this is often in no approach harmful to the baby or the mother. The blood that's discarded once birth commonly is collected and hold on at the bank.

2. personal twine Blood Banks could Send Our Baby's twine Blood for analysis

This is a whole story as personal twine blood banks provide exclusive accessibility and management to what you store. They charge you annually for storing this and can provide you with access as and after you need it within the future. Unlink public banks whereby the blood is also sent any for analysis functions.

3. select Any Bank, they're All constant

Wrong. personal blood banks ought to follow demanding norms in terms of quality, cost, location, and wish to be FDA-approved and AABB-accredited. However, not all personal ones have district attorney approval and AABB-accreditation. those that have each, have high annual storage fees and higher facilities to store your baby's twine blood for an extended period.

4. it's continuously higher to Store twine Blood in camera Banks

Many to-be folks usually assume storing their baby's twine blood in camera banks is healthier than donating it to a public bank. If your family includes a history of sure diseases and disorders, then selecting a non-public bank could sound logical. However, there's no such history and you do not even grasp if you may ever get to access the hold on this, then donating this to a public bank could be a wise call.

5. you cannot Treat Your kid With His/ Her Own Blood because it is also pathological Itself

This statement doesn't hold abundant ground as autologous transplants are in use for over a decade. Use of one's own stem cells has helped within the treatment of the many diseases starting from metastatic tumor, lymphocytic leukemia, etc.

6. This Blood will stay Viable just for Ten Years

Current studies have shown, stem cells hold on for regarding twenty-four years remained viable with none decrease in viability or proliferation. it's even claimed by cryopreser vationists these cells will be held on indefinitely in a very controlled setting.

7. twine Blood Banking And moral problems

According to the Indian Council of Medical analysis (ICMR), there square measure sure problems associated with the self-use of blood as promoted by such banks. The ICMR pointers for somatic cell analysis (2013) states there's no scientific basis for preservation of this for future self-use. Thus, this applies isn't formally suggested and any use apart from bone marrow transplantation excluding clinical trials is termed as medical malpractice.

8. you'll Decide regarding twine Blood Banking simply Before You Deliver

It is not a decent plan to form an unpunctual call in most of the cases. Your hospital might not have the gathering kit prepared throughout the child's birth. There square measure several supplying that require to be worked out before you'll store this. Thus, certify you register early to the presence of your selection for sleek and trouble-free assortment throughout the parturition|biological process} process.
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